Crofting

Last night, as part of the much anticipated NetworX conference held in Brussels, the European Commissioner Phil Hogan announced the 5 winners of the inaugural Rural Inspiration Awards.

The Scottish Rural Network would like to extend a massive congratulations to all 25 finalists, and the 5 overall winners.

The winners were:

Sustainable Land Management

To look at opportunities for sustainable land management/community farming/new ways of farming the land.

Find out more

Update 10 April 2019, please note this article has been updated to reflect the extended deadline for applications.

The 2019 Agri-Environment Climate Scheme (AECS) round is currently open to applications and closes on 17 April 2019.

Four young farmers and crofters have been appointed to champion a cultural and behavioural shift towards low-carbon, environmentally sustainable farming in Scotland.

The Young Farmer Climate Change Champions will work through peer-to-peer learning to highlight how farmers can improve efficiency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce costs, and enhance the sustainability of their businesses.

Rural Affairs Minister Mairi Gougeon made the announcement, which was a Programme for Government commitment, while visiting one of the champions’ croft in the Cairngorms.

Yvonne White, a crofter from Kingsburgh on the Isle of Skye, has been appointed to lead the Scottish Crofting Federation (SCF). At a board and council meeting held in Inverness last Friday, two new vice-chairs were also nominated and approved.

The next round of the Agri-Environment Climate Scheme (AECS) has opened for applications today (17 January).

AECS is part of the Scottish Rural Development Programme. It supports environmentally-friendly land management practices that aim to safeguard and improve Scotland's natural heritage and help businesses adapt to climate change.

Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing has confirmed that hill farmers and crofters in Scotland's most remote areas will continue to receive support under the Less Favoured Area Support Scheme into 2020.

The Less Favoured Area Support Scheme (LFASS) provides essential income support to farming businesses in remote and constrained rural areas.

Funding is used to:

Farmers across Europe are being asked to take part in an online survey about Precision Agriculture Technologies.

Precision Agriculture Technologies include the use of information technology, satellite positioning data, remote sensing and proximal data collection. The technologies can optimise production efficiency, improve working conditions, increase farmers’ income, and reduce unintended impacts on the environment. 

The 2019 Scotland's Finest Woods Award are open for entries.

This year's awards programme is the biggest ever, with the Farm Woodland category expanded and a unique one-off award to celebrate the centenary of the 1919 Forestry Act.

Scotland's Finest Woods Awards highlight all that is best in Scotland’s management of its woods and forests, and showcase how they contribute to the wealth and well-being of Scotland’s people. 

The 2019 Awards are:

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